• Global Study Reveals Positive Associations as a Key Driver in Maintaining Soil Biodiversity and Ecological Networks

    Microbial interactions are key to maintaining soil biodiversity. However, whether negative or positive associations govern the soil microbial system at a global scale remains virtually unknown, limiting our understanding of how microbes interact to support soil biodiversity and functions.
      In a study published in PNAS, researchers from the ISSCAS, the Institute of Natural Resources and Agrobiology of Seville (IRNAS), and the University of Cádiz analyzed 151 ecosystems across six continents, delving into the intricate coexistence network among diverse species including bac...

    2024-01-30
  • Magnetic biochar/quaternary phosphonium salt reduced antibiotic resistome and pathobiome on pakchoi leaves

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and human pathogenic bacteria (HPB) in leafy vegetable is a matter of concern as they can be transferred from soil, atmosphere, and foliar sprays, and poses a potential risk to public health. Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and human pathogenic bacteria (HPB) in leafy vegetable is a matter of concern as they can be transferred from soil, atmosphere, and foliar sprays, and poses a potential risk to public health. While traditional disinfection technologies are effective in reduc...

    2024-01-18
  • Gut microbiota research nexus: One Health relationship between human, animal, and environmental resistomes

    Antibiotics, extensively utilized in clinical infection treatment and as plant and animal husbandry growth promoters, have significantly contributed to increased life expectancy and socioeconomic progress.The emergence and rapid spread of antimicrobial resistance is of global public health concern. The gut microbiota harboring diverse commensal and opportunistic bacteria that can acquire resistance via horizontal and vertical gene transfers is considered an important reservoir and sink of anti...

    2024-01-15
  • Scientists explored effects of soil organic matter decomposability to temperature sensitivity of wetland carbon emissions

    Compelling evidence has shown that wetland methane emissions are more temperature dependent than carbon dioxide emissions across diverse hydrologic conditions. However, the availability of carbon substrates, which ultimately determines microbial carbon metabolism, has not been adequately acco...
      Wetlands store 29-45% of terrestrial soil organic carbon (SOC). Methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) are the dominant gaseous products of wetland SOC decomposition as well as the main causes of climate change primarily characterized by global warming. Since the global warming potential...

    2024-01-04
  • Potassium resources management systems in Chinese agriculture: Yield gaps and environmental costs

    In the pursuit of high crop yields, modern intensive agricultural cropping systems have generally emphasised larger inputs of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) than of potassium (K).China is the world's largest consumer of chemical fertilizers, with a strong reliance on imports of mineral K fertilizer up to 50 %. Inexpensive and renewable straw-K recycling is crucial for enhancing soil K fertility and carbon (C) sequestration. Here, national management networks for inorg...

    2024-01-04
  • Multi-metal contaminant mobilizations by natural colloids and nanoparticles in paddy soils during reduction and reoxidation

    Uncontrolled ore mining and smelting operations have led to the leaching of multi-metal contaminants, resulting in heavy metal contamination of surrounding soils. For paddy fields, heavy metal contamination could result in their accumulation in rice grains and pose a major threat to human hea...Naturally-occurring colloids and nanoparticles are crucial in transporting heavy metal contaminants in soil-water systems. However, information on particle-bound metals’ size distribution and elemental composition in paddy soils under redox-fluctuation is scarce. Here, Prof. Longhua WU from ...

    2023-12-21

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